Filtering by: Brown Bag Lecture

Aug
20
12:15 PM12:15

Week Nine: Brown Bag Lecture

 “The Best Trees for Home, Urban, & City Landscapes in the Northeast”
Speaker/Guide: Don Leopold
Distinguished Teaching Professor SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry, Author

Location: Smith Wilkes Hal

Understanding the best trees for home, urban, and city landscapes in the northeast will equip you with the knowledge to determine what you do for that next landscaping project.  Don Leopold Ph.D. will identify many different tree species that can be considered depending on site characteristics and desired aesthetics (size, form, flowering, fall color, unusual bark, etc.)  Some of the selection choices will even include food value.  The best tree species and rationale for their selection will be presented, as will tree species that should be avoided because of their liabilities.


After Don Leopold earned his Ph.D. in forest ecology from Purdue University in 1984, he joined the Dept. of Environmental and Forest Biology at SUNY ESF in ‘85.  He has taught dendrology every year since.  In 1998 he was promoted to Distinguished Teaching Professor and in 1999, he was awarded the first SUNY ESF College Foundation Award for Exceptional Achievement in teaching. In 2007 Don received the SUNY Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Faculty Service.  He was Chair of his Dept. from July 2005 recently stepped down at the end of Feb. 2019. 

In 2007 he began serving on the US Army Corp of Engineers National Technical Committee on Wetland Vegetation.  His research primarily focuses on the ecology of native plant species and natural communities, examining drivers of diversity and rarity at micro to macro scales; the restoration of unique plant communities on alkaline industrial wastes in urban areas; and applications of this research to sustainable, urban landscapes, and green solutions

Don has published six books, four of which are major treatments of trees in North America.  His 5th book, Native Plants of the Northeast: A Guide for Gardening and Conservation was given the Garden Writers Assn. Silver Media Award for excellence in horticultural writings. Don’s 7th book, Wildflowers of the Adirondacks, will be published later this year.  

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a_nOGRZu5zg


BTG's weekly Tuesday 12:15pm lecture platform features national experts presenting a range of topics concerning the natural world: wildlife, gardening, and the environment. Bring you lunch to Smith Wilkes Hall - lemon water provided. This signature lecture, usually with a slide show followed by Q&A, lasts approximately an hour. Engage with nature!

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Aug
13
12:15 PM12:15

Week Eight: Brown Bag Lecture

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“Purpose In The Landscape”
Speaker/Guide: Nellie Gardner
Horticulturist, cut flower farmer and historic landscape preservation consultant
Location: Smith Wilkes Hall

With no formal high school education and no money, discover how horticulturist Nell Gardner found opportunity and skill from growing up on Cape Bretton Island restoring old farmsteads and planting gardens in forgotten fields. Today she is owner of Flower Fields Farm and is the horticulturist for the Darwin Martin house, Greycliff and the Richardson Olmsted Complex. Using beautiful and harvestable plants, she will share tips and ideas from her agricultural experience that you can use to enhance your own landscape and home.   

With no formal high school education and no money, discover how horticulturist Nell Gardner found opportunity and skill from growing up on Cape Bretton Island restoring old farmsteads and planting gardens in forgotten fields. Today she is owner of Flower Fields Farm and is the horticulturist for the Darwin Martin house, Greycliff and the Richardson Olmsted Complex. Using beautiful and harvestable plants, she will share tips and ideas from her agricultural experience that you can use to enhance your own landscape and home.   


Through hard work and a dedication to the science and understanding of the natural world Nell Gardner has earned a reputation for problem solving, skilled technique, and expertise in horticultural management.  Through her hard scrabble farm upbringing in Nova Scotia to studying at Cornell University, she brings an expertise and quality to the field of Horticulture, seeing the landscape as an integrated whole, a system that needs balance and a thorough understanding of natural systems. Nell has worked for Cornell University as well as run her own consulting and Flower Farm for 25 years. Nell’s signature wreaths were featured in July 2018's Country Gardens Magazine, as a "resourceful recipe for long-lasting wreaths."   She currently works as the Horticulturist for the Darwin Martin house, Greycliff, and the Richardson Olmsted Complex.
https://www.flower-fields.com/

BTG's weekly Tuesday 12:15pm lecture platform features national experts presenting a range of topics concerning the natural world: wildlife, gardening, and the environment. Bring you lunch to Smith Wilkes Hall - lemon water provided. This signature lecture, usually with a slide show followed by Q&A, lasts approximately an hour. Engage with nature!

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Week Six: Brown Bag Lecture
Jul
30
12:15 PM12:15

Week Six: Brown Bag Lecture

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“Gardening With The Edisons”
Speaker/Guide: Marta McDowell

Author and teaches landscape history and horticulture at the NY Botanical Garden
Location: Smith Wilkes Hall

In their 40-plus year marriage, Mina Miller Edison and Thomas Edison created three gardens at their homes in West Orange, NJ, Fort Meyers, FL, and of course here at Chautauqua. They worked with Ellen Shipman, one if the premier landscape designers of their day. Mina was president for the Chautauqua Bird, Tree, and Garden Club. Thomas set up a botanic research laboratory with Henry Ford and Harvey Firestone. Come learn about what the Edisons grew, how they grew it, and the amazing research Thomas did into the possibilities of plants.


Marta McDowell teaches landscape history and horticulture at the New York Botanical Garden where she has been twice awarded "Instructor of the Year." She consults for private clients and public gardens. Her garden writing has appeared in popular publications such as Woman’s Day, Country Gardening and The New York Times.  Her first book Emily Dickenson’s Garden came out in 2005. Marta won a 2014 Gold Award from the Garden Writers Association for her book Beatrix Potter’s Gardening Life. Her 2015 book on the history of American gardening as seen through the White House grounds is called All the Presidents’ Gardens, which was on the New York Times bestsellers list.

http://www.martamcdowell.com

BTG's weekly Tuesday 12:15pm lecture platform features national experts presenting a range of topics concerning the natural world: wildlife, gardening, and the environment. Bring you lunch to Smith Wilkes Hall - lemon water provided. This signature lecture, usually with a slide show followed by Q&A, lasts approximately an hour. Engage with nature!

 

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Week Five: Brown Bag Lecture
Jul
23
12:15 PM12:15

Week Five: Brown Bag Lecture

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"Love and Death in the Life of a Firefly"
Speaker/Guide: Dr John Wenzel

Director, Powdermill Nature Reserve Carnegie Museum of Natural History
Location: Smith Wilkes Hall

Have you ever been curious about fireflies and their enticing photic communication system that they use in courtship? We will explore evolution of firefly flashing behavior originally derived as a defensive signal in the immature larva, then as a courtship device in adults, and finally as a predatory lure.


John Wenzel started studying insects at age 19 when he was a field assistant in Panama to famous entomologist and sociobiologist Edward O. Wilson. His career has taken him to many remote locations around the world, with more than three years in the field in tropical America and Africa, and a year in Europe. He has held positions at the National Museum of Natural History in Paris, France, and at the American Museum of Natural History, New York. He joined Ohio State Department of Entomology in 1994, where he was a professor for 17 years and won the highest teaching award Ohio State gives. He served as Director of the OSU Museum of Biological Diversity for ten years. John joined the Carnegie Museum of Natural History in 2011, where he has built new education and research programs at Powdermill Nature Reserve. John’s primary research has been on social insects such as ants, bees, and wasps, with a focus on the evolution of complex behavior and the organization of work. At Powdermill Nature Reserve, he founded an award-winning temperate ecology course for graduate students from Latin America. He and his staff also apply emerging technology to ecosystem science, such as their leading programs in using drones to capture landscape-level data, or using gigapixel technology to provide teaching tools for citizen scientists, and Virtual Reality 3D botanical models used for fun and teaching.

 http://www.carnegiemnh.org/science/default.aspx?id=17526

BTG's weekly Tuesday 12:15pm lecture platform features national experts presenting a range of topics concerning the natural world: wildlife, gardening, and the environment. Bring you lunch to Smith Wilkes Hall - lemon water provided. This signature lecture, usually with a slide show followed by Q&A, lasts approximately an hour. Engage with nature!

 

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Week Four: Brown Bag Lecture
Jul
16
12:15 PM12:15

Week Four: Brown Bag Lecture

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"The Monarch Bridge: A Story of Lasting Connections”
Speaker/Guide: Lori Stralow Harris
Butterfly farmer and Art-in-Nature Educator
Location: Smith Wilkes Hall

Lori recounts a quick series of mistakes and blunders just before the monarch migration. But it all led to lasting friendships and awesome gifts of hope. Immerse yourself in this heartwarming story of people motivated to help the monarchs and receiving rewarding gifts beyond their expectations.

Lori Harris opened Salt Creek Butterfly Farm in 2013 to provide her community with more opportunities for backyard nature encounters. Her BFA in painting and MA in interdisciplinary arts have contributed to the farm’s art-in-nature curriculum. In 2015 Lori planted butterfly habitat in a local retirement community and began the popular adopt-a-caterpillar program among seniors. Lori belongs to the Association for Butterflies, and the International Butterfly Breeders Association. Her first book, Butterfly Birthday, was released in 2017 with great response from the Monarch conservation community (and the preschoolers in her Montessori classroom). Lori lives in Western Springs, IL with her husband, Mark.

http://www.saltcreekbutterflyfarm.com

BTG's weekly Tuesday 12:15pm lecture platform features national experts presenting a range of topics concerning the natural world: wildlife, gardening, and the environment. Bring you lunch to Smith Wilkes Hall - lemon water provided. This signature lecture, usually with a slide show followed by Q&A, lasts approximately an hour. Engage with nature!

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Jul
9
12:15 PM12:15

Week Three: Brown Bag Lecture

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"Birds in Decline: Is It Time for Conservation Triage?”
Speaker/Guide: Dr. Bridget Stutchbury
Professor of Biology, York University in Toronto
Location: Smith Wilkes Hall

Dr. Stutchbury, author of Silence of Songbirds and The Private Lives of Birds, is hard at work on her next book that delves into the thorny issues of which species we should choose to save from extinction. She will discuss her research on why so many migratory songbirds are in steep decline and, more generally how limited funding for conservation means we cannot afford to save all species. Conservation favorites such as the California condor, whooping crane, and kakapo can persist for decades but at what cost to other less charismatic or well-know birds? This program addresses the difficult and soul-searching questions we confront in the Anthropocene era about what we can and should do for birds on the brink of extinction.


Bridget Stutchbury completed her M.Sc. at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario, her PH.D. at Yale, and was a postdoctoral fellow at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington D.C. Since the 1980’s she has studied migratory songbirds to understand their behavior, migration, and conservation. She has witnessed first-hand the shocking declines in many of our songbirds including wood thrushes, purple martins, and bobolinks. She studies the incredible migration journeys of songbirds and the many threats they face along the way. Dr. Stutchbury is on the board of Wildlife Preservation Canada whose mission is to prevent animal extinctions. She is the author of Silence of the Songbirds (2007) and The Bird Detective (2010) and was featured in the award-winning 2015 documentary The Messenger. Currently Bridget is a Distinguished Research Professor in the Department of Biology at the Stutchbury Lab York University, Toronto.

 https://www.yorku.ca/bstutch/index.htm

BTG's weekly Tuesday 12:15pm lecture platform features national experts presenting a range of topics concerning the natural world: wildlife, gardening, and the environment. Bring you lunch to Smith Wilkes Hall - lemon water provided. This signature lecture, usually with a slide show followed by Q&A, lasts approximately an hour. Engage with nature!

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Jul
2
12:15 PM12:15

Week Two: Brown Bag Lecture

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"Algal Blooms: The Good, the Bad, and the Beautiful”
Speaker/Guide: Dr Greg Boyer
Department of Chemistry, Professor of Biochemistry and Director, Great Lakes Research Consortium SUNY, College of Environmental Science and Forestry
Location: Smith Wilkes Hall

One of the predominant crises in fresh water lakes is algal and cyanobacteric blooms. Greg Boyer Ph.D., recognized expert on toxins and harmful compounds produced by marine and fresh water algae, will discuss the biology and chemistry of algae, why it grows, the local impact, and how to manage blooms.


Dr. Boyer received his B.A. in Biochemistry from the University of California at Berkeley and his Ph.D. in Biochemistry from the University of Wisconsin. After postdoctoral fellowships at the Plant Research Labs at Michigan State University and in the Department of Oceanography at the University of British Columbia, he joined the Faculty of Chemistry at SUNY-ESF in 1985. He was director of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Lower Great Lakes project to develop monitoring strategies for toxic blue-green algae in the lower great lakes and is currently one of the lead analytical chemists for the National Institute Lake Erie Center for Freshwater and Human Health. In this capacity, he also assists the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation with their Citizen State Lake Assessment Program with algal issues. Greg has served as chair of the Department of Chemistry at SUNY-ESF, and is a current advisor to the International Joint Commission on issues regarding Harmful Algal Blooms within the Great Lakes. He is the director of New York’s Great Lakes Research Consortium (GLRC) that consists of 18 New York Universities, 9 Canadian Universities, and almost 300 scientists in total, working on all aspects of Great Lakes Science, education, and outreach. Dr. Boyer’s is one of the most recognized experts with toxins and other compounds produced by marine and freshwater algae.

https://www.esf.edu/chemistry/boyer/

BTG's weekly Tuesday 12:15pm lecture platform features national experts presenting a range of topics concerning the natural world: wildlife, gardening, and the environment. Bring you lunch to Smith Wilkes Hall - lemon water provided. This signature lecture, usually with a slide show followed by Q&A, lasts approximately an hour. Engage with nature!

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Week One: Brown Bag Lecture
Jun
25
12:15 PM12:15

Week One: Brown Bag Lecture

"An Interpretation of Birds"
Speaker/Guide: Jim Robbins

Birder, NY Times contributor, author, science writer, free lance journalist

People interpret birds to understand more about how the dinosaurs learned to fly while others unpack the secrets of murmurations, when thousands of birds act as one. Some use the power of birds to save lives, by training at risk youths to become falconers. Bird expert and author Jim Robbins will talk about the myriad ways people interpret birds and offer some interpretations of his own into the miraculous world of birds and the powerful ways they enrich our lives.


Jim Robbins, a free-lance journalist for more than thirty years, lives with his family in Helena, Montana. He has been a frequent contributor to the New York Times since 1980, and has written for numerous magazines from Condé Nast Traveler to Smithsonian. He has carried out assignments in Europe, Mongolia, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Yanomami Territory in Brazil and Venezuela, and across North America, especially the Rocky Mountain West. He is the author of four books of non-fiction, and is at work on a fifth. His writing interests include science, the environment, and the human central nervous system. He has appeared on ABC’s Nightline and on NPR’s All Things Considered and Morning Edition. He considers the fact that he has been able to freely indulge his curiosity and get paid for it one of his greatest accomplishments.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4zuZ9SdE3bc

BTG's weekly Tuesday 12:15pm lecture platform features national experts presenting a range of topics concerning the natural world: wildlife, gardening, and the environment. Bring you lunch to Smith Wilkes Hall - lemon water provided. This signature lecture, usually with a slide show followed by Q&A, lasts approximately an hour. Engage with nature! Bring your lunch and a healthy appetite for learning.

 

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Aug
21
12:15 PM12:15

Week Nine: Brown Bag Lecture

Green Roof Landscapes that Improve the Environment
Speaker/Guide: Molly Meyer
Scientist, Entrepeneur

Location: Smith Wilkes Hal

Molly Meyer, discusses the latest developments of natural green roofs using a mere few inches of engineered soil reinventing formerly 'barren' space into growing habitats. These “working landscapes” both look attractive and serve additional functions: from managing storm water and growing crops, to creating habitats and engaging spaces for people. Learn about her American green roof company that developed a groundbreaking green roof system, from the CEO and Founder's perspective of Omni Ecosystems.


Molly Meyer is the CEO and Founder of Omni Ecosystems. She leads Omni’s strategy and business development and oversees Omni’s product innovation and field operations. She founded Omni with the mission to democratize access to natural spaces, and to create an organization that continuously engages in bold endeavors that elevate the triple bottom line: ecological, financial, and social. Molly is also the Co-Founder & CEO of The Roof CropTM, a commercial rooftop farming company in Chicago. Her background couples her work at Stanford University in systems problem-solving and in biogeochemical research with field experience in construction means and methods that she gained working as a carpenter and green roof installer as a Robert Bosch Fellow in Germany. These experiences were foundational in redefining the American green roof industry with Omni’s groundbreaking Comprehensive green roof system. Her inventions include Omni’s patented living wall panel and Omni’s patent-pending green roof drainage system. Molly is a Board Member of Openlands, a 55-year-old non-profit dedicated to protecting open space in northeastern Illinois and surrounding region, and an Executive Board Member of the Women's Leadership Initiative within Urban Land Institute Chicago.

BTG's weekly Tuesday 12:15pm lecture platform features national experts presenting a range of topics concerning the natural world: wildlife, gardening, and the environment. Bring you lunch to Smith Wilkes Hall - lemon water provided. This signature lecture, usually with a slide show followed by Q&A, lasts approximately an hour. Engage with nature!

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Week Six: Brown Bag Lecture
Jul
31
12:15 PM12:15

Week Six: Brown Bag Lecture

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“Raised Beds and Compost: The Keys to Organic Success
Speaker/Guide: Mike McGrath

Gardener, Radio Host
Location: Smith Wilkes Hall

Mike McGrath, host of the nationally syndicated Public Radio show, “You Bet Your Garden,” shares his knowledge on how to be a successful gardener with raised beds and compost. Are you still a “flat earth“ gardener? Learn how to grow twice as much in half the space and without weeds by “growing up.”


Mike McGrath is the host of the nationally syndicated Public Radio show, "You Bet Your Garden".  His program is an hour of “chemical-free horticultural hijinks”, and airs every Saturday morning in Philadelphia, and at various times on other Public Radio stations across the nation. Mike is the Garden Editor for WTOP News Radio in Washington, DC and contributing editor and columnist for Greenprints magazine.  He is the former Editor-in-Chief of Organic Gardening magazine and author of books on tomatoes, compost, seed saving, and kitchen gardening.

BTG's weekly Tuesday 12:15pm lecture platform features national experts presenting a range of topics concerning the natural world: wildlife, gardening, and the environment. Bring you lunch to Smith Wilkes Hall - lemon water provided. This signature lecture, usually with a slide show followed by Q&A, lasts approximately an hour. Engage with nature!

 

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Week Five: Brown Bag Lecture
Jul
24
12:15 PM12:15

Week Five: Brown Bag Lecture

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"Amazing Private Gardens"
Speaker/Guide: Sally Cunningham

Garden Expert
Location: Smith Wilkes Hall

Garden touring is a growing trend, but seeing great gardens can also be daunting. What are you seeing? What lessons can you apply to your own yard and garden? What do other gardeners do that turns “just pretty” into “Wow”? With photographs from her travels—from the famous Garden Walk Buffalo to England and Ireland--Sally will help you look with new eyes at superior plants and understand how to use your space, art, and hardscape. You will leave ready to add new personality and character to your own garden. This is also a preview of Sally’s new book on this topic—expected publication date October 2018. 


Sally Cunningham is a garden expert and landscape professional, writer for the Buffalo News and Buffalo Spree Magazine, and tour director for Great Garden Travel  AAA Horizon Club Tours. She is a former Cornell Cooperative Extension Agent , Master Gardener, and consultant at Lockwood’s Greenhouses in Hamburg. Sally is author of Great Garden Companions (Rodale Books), contributor to many books including The Encyclopedia of Organic Gardening, and is currently working on a new book about Amazing Private Gardens. Sally has been awarded Landscape Professional of the Year by the New York State and Region 6 nursery and landscape associations, and recognized for her contributions to ecology education by the WNY Land Conservancy.

BTG's weekly Tuesday 12:15pm lecture platform features national experts presenting a range of topics concerning the natural world: wildlife, gardening, and the environment. Bring you lunch to Smith Wilkes Hall - lemon water provided. This signature lecture, usually with a slide show followed by Q&A, lasts approximately an hour. Engage with nature!

 

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Week Four: Brown Bag Lecture
Jul
17
12:15 PM12:15

Week Four: Brown Bag Lecture

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"Collisions Between Birds and Windows: A Vital Conservation Issue”
Speaker/Guide: Dan Klem, Jr.
Scientist

Location: Smith Wilkes Hall

Years of study reveal a number of historic accounts of birds striking windows, with investigations that document and validate that birds behave as if clear and reflective windows are invisible to them. A billion birds annually are estimated to die striking windows in the U.S. alone. With the exception of habitat destruction, and losses to domestic cats, more birds are annually killed flying into windows than any other human-associated avian mortality factor; exponentially more than the higher image attrition attributable to communication towers, oil spills, pesticides and poisons, vehicles, and wind turbines. The results of research addressing the evaluation of preventing bird-window collisions have revealed several effective methods, but additional education and short- and long-term solutions are needed to ensure the human-built environment is safe for birds the world over.


Daniel Klem, Jr. is Professor of Biology and Sarkis Acopian Professor of Ornithology and Conservation Biology at Muhlenberg College in Allentown, PA. Considered the foremost scientific expert on avian mortality attributable to windows, he studies, writes, and teaches about the threat that sheet glass and plastic pose to birds. He is supported by research grants from government agencies, NGO’s, and industry to evaluate methods to prevent these avian deaths by retrofitting existing windows and developing new bird-safe panes for remodeling and new construction. His research has resulted in U.S. patents to guide the development of novel films and windows using ultraviolet signals that birds see and humans do not.

BTG's weekly Tuesday 12:15pm lecture platform features national experts presenting a range of topics concerning the natural world: wildlife, gardening, and the environment. Bring you lunch to Smith Wilkes Hall - lemon water provided. This signature lecture, usually with a slide show followed by Q&A, lasts approximately an hour. Engage with nature!

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Jul
10
12:15 PM12:15

Week Three: Brown Bag Lecture

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"Chautauqua Architectural”
Speaker/Guide: Bob Jeffrey
Architect, Institution Architecture Review Board Chair, Institution Trustee, Entrepreneur
Location: Smith Wilkes Hall

This lecture will explore the unique development of Chautauqua’s architecture as it relates to the summer tour.  There will be a focus on the styles of the homes that will be toured and the unique changes in the development pattern from original cottages, to post WW II suburban style homes, to the recent return to the original cottage type of development.  Learn what changes in society and inventions fueled these changes in the development patterns.


Bob Jeffrey holds a Bachelor of Environmental Design from Miami Univ. and a Masters in Architecture Specializing in Historic Preservation from Kent State. Bob is the president of two businesses, Maviro Corp. and Town Improvement Assn. Inc. which specialize in the renovation and adaptive reuse of historic buildings. He currently servers or recently has served on St. Petersburg  Community Preservation Board, President and board member of the Historic Kenwood Neighborhood Assn., board member of the Grand Central Distric Assn., co-chair of the Central Avenue Council, representative, CPOA, chair of the Architectural Review Board, and Trustee of Chautauqua Institution.  He has been honored with a number of awards including Preservationist of the Year 2002 and 2013 by St. Petersburg Preservation and the Award of Excellence in 2008 by the Tampa Bay American Institute of Architects.

BTG's weekly Tuesday 12:15pm lecture platform features national experts presenting a range of topics concerning the natural world: wildlife, gardening, and the environment. Bring you lunch to Smith Wilkes Hall - lemon water provided. This signature lecture, usually with a slide show followed by Q&A, lasts approximately an hour. Engage with nature!

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Jul
3
12:15 PM12:15

Week Two: Brown Bag Lecture

"A Wilder Garden: The Natural World of Laura Ingalls Wilder”
Speaker/Guide: Marta McDowell
Garden Author, Instructor, Historian
Location: Smith Wilkes Hall

Join "BTG Perennial' author Marta McDowell presenting her newest book “A Wilder Garden: The Natural World of Laura Ingalls Wilder”. Marta will share lessons of the world of Laura Ingalls Wilder, author of the Little House on the Prairie books. Discover the world of prairie, forest, farm, garden, and natural history of this beloved American children’s author.


Marta McDowell teaches landscape history and horticulture at the New York Botanical Garden where she has been twice awarded "Instructor of the Year." She consults for private clients and public gardens. Her garden writing has appeared in popular publications such as Woman’s Day, Country Gardening and The New York Times.  Her first book Emily Dickenson’s Garden came out in 2005. Marta won a 2014 Gold Award from the Garden Writers Association for her book Beatrix Potter’s Gardening Life. Her 2015 book on the history of American gardening as seen through the White House grounds is called All the Presidents’ Gardens, which was on the New York Times bestsellers list.

BTG's weekly Tuesday 12:15pm lecture platform features national experts presenting a range of topics concerning the natural world: wildlife, gardening, and the environment. Bring you lunch to Smith Wilkes Hall - lemon water provided. This signature lecture, usually with a slide show followed by Q&A, lasts approximately an hour. Engage with nature!

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Week One: Brown Bag Lecture
Jun
26
12:15 PM12:15

Week One: Brown Bag Lecture

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"English Gardens and the People Who Designed Them"
Speaker/Guide: Melinda Wolcott

Award Winning Garden Designer and Garden Tour Host
Location: Smith Wilkes Hall

Beginning with the 18th century gardens of Blenheim Palace to gardens of the 21st century, we will examine the styles and personalities who created them. A 'perennial' BTG lecturer, Melinda has spent considerable time in the UK (and even married a Brit!) expanding her knowledge and time in these quintessential British spaces. 


Melinda is a National Garden Club Inc. Flower Show Judge, and an award winning floral designer and instructor of floral design. Having lived in England, Italy, and Singapore, led her to her interest in designing and leading garden tours. She recently left her Connecticut home of 30 years and moved to California where she is designing her new garden with native plantings and plants that attract birds and butterflies.She's also offering Gardening Workshops Weeks 4, 6, and 8 on Wednesdays 4:15pm in Smith Wilkes Hall along with Chris Flanders.

BTG's weekly Tuesday 12:15pm lecture platform features national experts presenting a range of topics concerning the natural world: wildlife, gardening, and the environment. Bring you lunch to Smith Wilkes Hall - lemon water provided. This signature lecture, usually with a slide show followed by Q&A, lasts approximately an hour. Engage with nature!

 

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Aug
15
12:15 PM12:15

Week Eight: Brown Bag Lecture

Floral Design For Summer  
Speaker/Guide: Melinda Wolcott
National Garden Club Inc. Flower Show Judge and Award Winning Floral Designer, Winery Owner
Location: Smith Wilkes Hall

Melinda’s lecture and demonstration will include four floral designs using materials easily found on the grounds, in your gardens, and at local vegetable stands.  The elements and principles of design will be used to enhance understanding and practical application for your designs.  The designs wil be simple to master and fun to have on your porch or dining table. Linda has a creative yet classic flair for design - and a sense of humor to match. 

 


Melinda Wolcott has spent her summers on Lake Chautauqua her entire life.  As a National Garden Club Inc. Flower Show Judge, she is an award winning floral designer and instructor of Floral Design.  Having lived in England, Italy, and Singapore, she brings her experiences from living abroad into her designs. She also owns a winery in California.  

 

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Aug
16
12:15 PM12:15

Week Eight: Brown Bag Lecture

Dragonflies & Damselflies of a Restored Pennsylvania Wetlands
Speaker/Guide: Dennis M. McNair
Location: Smith Wilkes Hall

In the early 1990s, an old cornfield was restored to its historic wetland status, with large and small ponds excavated and diked, and native vegetation returned. Once the habitat was established, Dennis McNair, emeritus biology professor at University of Pittsburgh, began monitoring the birds, plants and insects as they returned. He gave special attention to the establishment of odonate (dragonfly and damselfly) species. The effort verifies "if you build it, they will come."

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